The Bowery Ballroom
Title Fight

Title Fight

Tigers Jaw, Pianos Become the Teeth, Single Mothers

Thu, November 29, 2012

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

The Bowery Ballroom

New York, NY

$12 advance / $15 day of show

Sold Out

This event is all ages

Title Fight
Title Fight
Musical trends come and go, but the bands who stick around are the ones who eschew whatever's popular in favor of playing the music that's in their hearts—and Kingston, Pennsylvania's Title Fight are a perfect example of this. Originally formed in 2003 by guitarist/vocalist Jamie Rhoden and the twin brother duo of vocalist/bassist Ned Russin and drummer Ben Russin when the trio were barely teenagers, Title Fight started as a way for these young kids to explore their burgeoning love of hardcore. But after adding guitarist Shane Moran in 2005, something funny happened: Their tireless practicing eventually transformed them into one of the most exciting hardcore acts in recent memory.

After releasing a handful of EPs and 7-inches as well as performing shows all over the world, Title Fight began attracting attention from fans and labels who were captivated by the way the band managed to put a modern spin on the melodic hardcore sound pioneered by acts like Gorilla Biscuits and Lifetime—and in 2010 the members of Title Fight dropped out of college in order to tour full-time with acts such as New Found Glory, Four Year Strong and H20. It was also around this time that the band entered the studio with Gorilla Biscuits/Quicksand guitarist Walter Schreifels who agreed to produce the band and promptly drove down to Northeastern Pennsylvania to help them prepare to record their highly anticipated full-length debut Shed.

"The cool thing about Walter is that when we came to him he told us he doesn't produce a lot of records because he's a full-time musician himself, so he only works with bands he really likes and hearing that was a huge compliment because he's one of our biggest inspirations," Ned Russin explains. "We were really up front about the fact that we wanted to feel in control with our music so he really just let us do our thing but came up with some helpful suggestions without trying to transform us into something we aren't," he continues when asked about Schreifels' role in the process. "He came down and stayed at Ned and Ben's parents' house and we just hashed it all out in Jamie's parents' basement."

From there the band headed to Philadelphia to record Shed over a grueling two-week period at the legendary Studio 4. However all those long nights paid off as Shed sees the band implementing various subgenres that range from old-school hardcore to aggressive punk rock that make these twelve energetic anthems instant classics for a new generation of listeners searching for music that inspires them as much as Title Fight were inspired by their heroes. "We wrote the last record when we were in high school and since then
we've dropped out of school, seen the world and had life experiences that are all reflected here," Ned Russin explains when asked what it's been like to sacrifice everything to make Shed a reality.

From the Hot Water Music-esque power of "27" to the old-school feel of "You Can't Say Kingston Doesn't Love You," Shed is also a remarkably varied record that proves hardcore doesn't need to be formulaic in order to be powerful. "The most important thing is that this is a Title Fight record," Ned Russin summarizes, "we're not trying to pose and be anything we're not." Moran concurs adding, "we're not a surface level band, we're the kind of act who likes to dig a little deeper and we're really interested in learning about the history of punk and hardcore to find the stuff that really speaks to us on a personal level."

Speaking of personal, Shed also features some of the band's most heartfelt lyrics to date—a fact that is largely due to the life-changing experiences the band have endured, both good and band since their previous recordings. "This album was a lot more collaborative from a lyrical perspective and instead of being about girls, it's about real life situations," Ned Russin says. "Throughout the past few years my grandmother passed away and my dad had reconstructive heart surgery so a lot has been on my mind and Title Fight has always been a great release for me to get out what's bottled up inside," he continues. "We just tried to be as sincere as we possibly could and write songs about what was important to us at the time."
Ultimately this sentiment has always remained at the core of Title Fight and it's one of the reasons why so many fans have gravitated toward the band's music despite the fact that they don't have any fancy costumes or onstage gimmicks. "I think we have a unique dynamic because we can always play a hardcore show with our friends in a basement but we can also play a show with more commercial bands on a larger scale and be accepted in both situations," Moran explains.

"We've been a band for seven years and this is the first time we've had a recording that's longer than seven minutes long," Ned Russin adds. "The last year has been a crazy ride but the whole time we've always stayed true to the fact that we're not trying to be anything we're not," he summarizes. "We're four friends that play in a band together and we would still be doing this whether we were playing to five people or five hundred of them."
Tigers Jaw
Tigers Jaw
Between the power pop melodies of early Saves the Day and the hard driving fold rhythms of Fleetwood Mac lies TIGERS JAW, a band who’s raw immediacy is infectious and intoxicating. Shimmering organ textures, chunky guitar chords, and male/female vocal harmonies show the Scranton, PA natives taking rural rock music from its legendary past to its vibrant future. Among the more innovative acts on Run For Cover Record’s star studded roster, TIGERS JAW have a profound musical purity that is as equally stirring in a basement of 40 people as it is in a club of 1,000.
Pianos Become the Teeth
Pianos Become the Teeth
Pianos Become The Teeth has a melodic yet uncompromising sound that brings to mind such diverse and influential bands as Thursday, Envy and City of Caterpillar. Brimming with sincerity and brandishing an experimental ambiance, the band is pushing beyond the boundaries of a stale genre. Mixing elements of screamo, hardcore as well as post rock, Old Pride breathes new life into a once decaying scene

Read more: http://topshelfrecords.com/tsr2/_pages/artist_pianos_become_the_teeth.php#ixzz1XNOskBMY
Single Mothers
Single Mothers
Often described as frantic, frenzied and outrageous Single Mothers exists upon the fundamental that live music should be an interactive experience. A typical Single Mothers show usually consists of sing alongs, crowd surfing, flying guitars and mosh pits. The sound itself is almost as fraught as the history of the band. Originally the brainchild of Andrew Thomson, the band set out to create loud catchy music and over it's course evolved into an amalgamation of punk, indie and post hardcore.

The band currently consists of Drew Thomson on vocals, Michael Peterson on lead guitar, Evan Redsky on bass, Justis Krar on rhythm guitar and Matt Bouchard on drums.

The sound takes root in fast rhythms and intricate drum work layered with powerful rhythm guitar and bass. the lead guitar is often melodic, dark and catchy while the vocals for the most part are harsh, anthematic and raspy. Lyrically the songs are characteristic of folk tales, as stories of drug deals, failed relationships and being broke are often reoccurring. The raunchy and sometimes offensive lyrics go hand in hand with the attitude and style of the band which possesses a great deal of irony as clearly represented in the band name. The mantra of the band will always be to have a good time and create enjoyable experiences both live and on recording with the hope of establishing an interaction between the listener and the band. They were formed in London, Ontario, Canada in 2009.
Venue Information:
The Bowery Ballroom
6 Delancey St
New York, NY, 10002
http://www.boweryballroom.com/