The Bowery Ballroom
Generationals

Generationals

Splashh, Companion

Mon, April 22, 2013

Doors: 7:30 pm / Show: 8:30 pm

The Bowery Ballroom

New York, NY

$12 advance / $15 day of show

Sold Out

This event is 18 and over

Generationals
Generationals
Ted Joyner and Grant Widmer, friends since high school and Generationals co-captains since 2008, have been in each others' faces for most of this century. Natural songwriting partners, they made their first three records at home with the help of mutual friend Daniel Black, and in 2013 they launched straight into their fourth with surprising post-tour energy, but after years of creative brain-melding, the dyad had reached a point of ultra-familiarity and comfort in their work routine that, to them, threatened quicksand. They began to suspect their own productivity of being rut in disguise.

Determined to keep things fresh, they sought out a new producer who might be able shake things up, surprise them, and bring something new to the project. How about Richard Swift? they said. He's the best, he's the boss, he's like the John Keating of cool drum sounds—a perfect fit for a pair of poppy throwback tape-lovers like us.

The Louisiana duo made their way, yellow brick road-style, to Cottage Grove, Oregon, ready to give their tapes over to Swift's cultishly venerated magic touch, but the collaboration was hardly the scrap-it-all, start-from-scratch, give-up-the-reins-and-let-the-guru-do-his-thing scenario Ted and Grant had expected—hoped for even—when they began their pilgrimage to Swift's National Freedom studio in February. Swift deemed the demos album-worthy after all and the original versions were saved at his urging. With a little tightening rather than a vibe transplant, the songs solidified into a cohesive, finished, good-feeling record.

"I looked at the demos objectively and really just helped organize the sounds into something that was sonically cohesive," Swift said. "I knew they spent a lot of time on their own, on their headphones creating these beats and bells and whistles and felt no need to drastically change them."

The final version of Alix materialized as perhaps Generationals' most confident record yet, full of history and as multiphase as Ted and Grant's friendship. Built up with layer upon layer of rhythmic lines, computer noises, RZA beats, and poppy vocals that sometimes sound like a Janet Jackson/Prince face-off, Alix is everything T&G like about music: old and new, vinyl and youtube, vocal chord and microkorg, gathered up from everywhen and arranged with great care into a good-smelling, subtly sexy, catchy-or-die mish-mosh of sensibilities and time-warp senselessness, lightly peppered with that signature Swiftian element, but undeniably Generationals in taste. As Swift had decreed: 'tis a good idea to tear down and rebuild, but it's not always necessary to start from scratch.
Splashh
Splashh
Splashh began life as the brainchild of Toto Vivian and Sasha Carlson forming in late February 2012. The duo initially bonded over their mutual music tastes and then began plotting their sun drenched musical assault on the UK. Growing up between the South Pacific and the UK they left the beaches behind to record in a small bedroom in Hackney. The result was a myriad of floating, fuzz laden grunge pop tunes with a punk twist. With a number of songs in the can the boys then recruited close friends Thomas Beal on bass and Jacob Moore on drums. The 2 new additions made for a sense of excitement that Splashh were primed and ready to roll as a band.

The carefree attitude within their music transports the listener to the summers of yesteryear kicking back with good friends. Sounds of dreamy fuzz being thrust through the walls of your neighbour’s garage as the “slackers on summer holiday” dream of adventure, fun and the open road. With releases planned through the summer, plenty of gigs and a hungry music loving public awaiting, it seems as if the adventure isn’t too far away.
Companion
Companion
Companion, a new project from Pepi Ginsberg (Red, East Is East), is defined by lush vocal arrangements and strong rhythmic hooks. A clear departure from Ginsberg's earlier work, Companion delivers artful pop with a twist.

The process of developing this new sound began around Ginsberg's thorough home recordings of her songs, along with vocal harmonies she created with Anna Thorngate and Amy Carrigan—both of whom she enlisted from the ranks of the Brooklyn Ladies Choir, an all-women singing group she'd formed in the winter of 2010. To flesh out these vocal-centric versions of the songs, she picked up her own guitar and turned to her longtime bass player, Tim Lappin, plus new guitarist Kirk Schoenherr and drummer Justin Veloso. In the studio, the band started to create a sound that incorporated elements both organic and electronic, often incorporating Ginsberg's homemade beats: "I needed to learn how to write harder parts on my guitar and sing more challenging melodies, and I was listening to a lot of HOT 97," she says. "I wanted to build beats and have electronic aspects to the music, so I had to figure out how to write them, and blend those ideas with the organic nature of the songs."

The production on the band's eponymous debut is big and airy. With help from people like Jake Aron (Grizzly Bear, Yeasayer, Jamie Lidell) and Nathan Sabatino (Dr. Dog), the album is powerful, rich and compelling. It marks an auspicious and mature beginning for a young band.
Venue Information:
The Bowery Ballroom
6 Delancey St
New York, NY, 10002
http://www.boweryballroom.com/