The Bowery Ballroom
The Growlers

BURGERAMA Caravan Of Stars Tour

The Growlers

Cosmonauts, Gap Dream, together PANGEA, Habibi, White Fang with Colleen Green

Sat, October 5, 2013

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 7:30 pm

The Bowery Ballroom

New York, NY

$15 advance / $18 day of show

Sold Out

This event is 16 and over

The Growlers
The Growlers
The music of The Growlers is unmistakable.
Sure, you can hone in on some influences baked into the work of this California-bred band. Heck, even they’d cop to a few, like Ricky Nelson and The Clash. But once those same RIYL tags have been filtered through the minds and hands and voices of this five-piece, there’s simply nothing else like it.
The Growlers took the phrase “Beach Goth” as an apt descriptor of their music. Sunburned and salty, that term perfectly describes their distinctive melding of reverb heavy surf guitar and Bakersfield-style honky tonk with ‘80s post-punk.
This is especially true of Chinese Fountain, The Growlers’ fifth full-length set to be released on September 23rd via Everloving Records. The 11 songs found on it are some of the strongest that they’ve committed to tape yet; a byproduct not only of eight years in the trenches together, but finely honing their gypsy folk dirges and psychedelic sea shanties to fans at close to 150 shows each year. The connection between vocalist Brooks Nielsen and guitarist Matt Taylor (the principal songwriters of the group) has only grown deeper.
“The band played better than they’ve ever played,” says Nielsen. “We’ve got the process down now. There’s less screwing around to get the songs laid out and we weren’t waiting around for take after take. We knew it and we played without much time to spare.”
That confidence bleeds through every track on Chinese Fountain, with the band assured enough to layer in shades of many new influences: the loping ska beat of “Dull Boy” and “Going Gets Tuff,” the playful disco beat behind the title track, or the Teardrop Explodes-like agitation of “Good Advice.”
Not that the band left themselves much room to second-guess anything. The five spent about three weeks writing the tracks, and about half that time in the studio recording them. That may sound rushed, but it’s not as if you can hear any strain on the finished product; Chinese Fountain is as rock solid and watertight as anything in their still-growing discography.
There’s evolution to be heard in Chinese Fountain as well, courtesy of some of Nielsen’s most pointed and poignant lyrics to date. He takes our obsession with the online world to task on the funky title track. When he drops the bomb that obliterates that most famous of Beatles’ claims with "The internet is bigger than Jesus or John Lennon” he re-contextualizes Marshall McLuhan's "the medium is the message" in the same breath. He urges positivity no matter the obstacles (“Going Gets Tuff”). Too, he reveals a tattered heart to the world on tracks like “Rare Hearts” and “Love Test.”
“This is my chance to let it all out,” Nielsen says of these songs. “I kind of bottle things up and don’t really get emotional. But I think if I don’t open up, I’d be a really stale person.”
Cosmonauts
Cosmonauts
"Their raucous set was like if the Velvet Underground had turned to the MC5 at their Boston Tea Party concert in 1968 and, instead of insulting them, had turned and made love to them—and that was how Lou Reed wound up wearing that dog collar. I couldn't make out a single lyric, but did they really close the set with 'Little Honda?'" --LA RECORD

"Swirling, distorted psych, bulldozed along by pounding primitive drums, fuzzed out vocals, all glued together with a heavy spaced out guitar drone. If that ain't the ingredients for record of the month my name is Prince Bloody William. Imagine if you will the best of THEE OH SEES jamming deep with MOON DUO, with the aid of some sort of retro type drug that only Brace Belden knows the name of and you would almost be right on the money. Heavy, without losing one single hook, repetitive without being the least bit boring and shamelessly stepped in the glory years of acid rock without being a boring regurgitating hipster. Be warned, this record will give you a contact high." --Maximum Rock N Roll #337
Gap Dream
Gap Dream
From glam to gunk this Ohio trippy man can be found making his home recordings that range from Peter Koppes to Slade. Or just at home resting with his pretty little pup Judy. Nothing stands in Gabriel Fulvimar's way.
together PANGEA
together PANGEA
From Los Angeles by-way-of Newhall, Pangea play poppy, snotty, shitty, fitty, punky, stunky garage-pop and roll. est. 2005
Habibi
Habibi
Habibi is the brainchild of Rahill Jamalifard and Lenny Lynch. Together, the two Detroit natives started the all-girl, Brooklyn-based project in the spring of 2011. Growing up with the harmonious sounds of Motown and the punk attitudes of Quatro and Iggy, their music invokes the same simplicity and fiery spirit. Jamalifard's Persian ancestry and Lynch's love of Middle Eastern culture are evident in the bands name (Habibi's translation is my love in Arabic), their mystical lyrics, and their eastern tinged melodies.

In the short span of time since their formation Habibi has captured the interest of audiences and labels abroad, eager to hear more of their simple and catchy songs. The four piece featuring Erin Campbell on bass and Karen Isabel on drums look forward to their upcoming single and their first full length album.
White Fang with Colleen Green
four freebirds high on life/doing the things we wanna do/we'll get as high as we fucking please/fuck it.
Venue Information:
The Bowery Ballroom
6 Delancey St
New York, NY, 10002
http://www.boweryballroom.com/